Los Angeles-based artist and writer Maya Gurantz talks about:

Getting out of the staid confines of where she grew up, and what it was (and is) like being an angry feminist from an early age; her ‘accountability group,’ a group of women artists (from various art forms) she organized to hold each other accountable to work-related goals; her teaching and mentoring of students, at U.C. Santa Barbra; making work that is “messy,” as in tending to be potentially less likable than other work;  and three of her epic essays: one on James Turrell related to his retrospective at LACMA, one on Carl Andre and Ana Mendieta (the piece that led us to Maya initially; and here is an Art Practical piece on them that Maya highly recommends), and one as yet unpublished piece on Mike Kelley’s Mobile Homestead.

IF YOU ARE TRAPPED Insta

TAKE IT Insta

Drawing Restrainment 2011

Along with co-host (and gallerist) Deb Klowden Mann, Los Angeles-based Matthew Gardocki, former gallery manager at Patrick Painter and Mark Moore galleries, talks about:

His decade-plus time working for two long-running L.A. galleries, the different management style of each, how he transitioned from one gallery to the other (they were across the parking lot from each other at Bergamot Station in Santa Monica), and how he became a good fireman (by getting really good at putting out fires); his experiences going to art fairs, both to sell and to sneak in a little travel; we talk about the viability of mid-sized and/or family galleries as business models, vis-à-vis the recent closing of Matthew’s last employer Mark Moore; various art world comparisons, particularly mid-sized galleries vs. the big galleries, the big galleries vs. museums, secondary market sales as a way for a gallery to survive (and how the 2ndary market has dried up according to Matthew), and the challenge of mid-tier galleries; how he’s looking for gallery work, and what’s come up in his interviews, including his availability as a father of a 2-year-old; the reliability (or lack thereof) of collectors making studio or gallery visits; gender bias in the workplace, and finally, Matthew shares a very unusual birth story (of his daughter) that you likely haven’t heard before.

Huffinton Post Arts writer Priscilla Frank talks about:

Writing about art and culture for the Huffington Post, including how her writing and their audience differs from other visual arts hubs like Hyperallergic, and the difference between paid staff writing for the site and blog writing for the site, as well as the realities of click bait; outsider art, including the Outsider Art Fair, and why she’s a fan of the niche and its artists; her piece “F**k Your Idols: What Celebrity Worship Reveals About Female Sexuality,” which deconstructs women’s ambiguous desires to both be and/or f**k a given celebrity hero, in this case Rihanna…she argues her point by contrasting females tendencies with males through the avant garde-ish Is Tropical video “Dancing Anymore” (seen below), as well as John Berger’s Ways on Seeing, and how a woman puts more into how she presents herself is part of that; how, in contrast to what art writer Ben Davis suggested, Frank believes that art does for sure trickle into the popular culture (Beyonce, etc.); how cats have always been associated with femininity and feminine power, but it’s the artist Carolee Schneeman who has really tapped into that connection in her photo and video work; her discovery of the Oakland-based artist Stephanie Sarley, and her crazy-great fruit-sex Instagram videos and anthropomorphized vagina drawings; and how both she and Sarley’s goals are to get more women artists recognized, and how proud Frank is of her record of such a smorgasbord of coverage she does for the Post.


Megaforce Is tropical Dancing Anymore from website on Vimeo.

Los Angeles-based artist and witch (yes, you read that right) Amanda Yates Garcia, along with co-host Deb Klowden Mann, talks about:

Her beloved craftsman home in the West Adams neighborhood, and how she got in before the gentrification race that’s going on now; how she answers the question of what she does by saying that she’s a witch, and the ensuing conversation around that, including being a provocateur even when she doesn’t feel like being one; artists and witches through the ages, and how the meaning of being a witch can be as diverse as the meanings of being an artist; how a big part of being a witch, for her, is examining authority- who gets to make the rules; how to invoke your spirit figure, whether it’s a name that’s been invoked many times, from your own culture ideally, or more one of your own created entity; how magic, not unlike art, is not about belief, believing in magic, or believing in art; how she was raised in a Wiccan household with a feminist mother, but who also had a lot of patriarchal ideas; the failings of patriarchy today, and what happened in her “Devouring Patriarchy – Healing the Wounds of the Father” workshop; how, in addition to representing for witches, she’s also representing for ‘healing,’ a maligned word in the context of contemporary art, but she doesn’t give a f*ck—it’s desperately needed in our world now (that and love); her performance “Capitalism Exorcism” ritual; the subtle distinctions between objects used in performance/ceremony as ritual objects, and becoming art objects; how she is able to sustain herself as a witch, but not an artist; how she’s no longer attached to the idea of being known as ‘an artist,’ an identity that she (and many) was especially attached to out of grad school; and she offers a magical financial tip, having to do with getting (buying) the thing that you yourself are selling.

Los Angeles-based painter Max Maslansky, along with co-host Deb Klowden Mann, talks about:
His Kchung radio show Riffin’, and his most memorable guest on the show (Jake Longstreth, with whom he debated about The Eagles); how he started the current iteration of his porn-based work, back in 2010, when he began collecting old photographs and storing them on Facebook, in both ‘public’ and ‘private’ collections, then selecting particular images to paint onto bedsheets; how porn, even in the art world, still has a taboo association to it, and how the porn Maslansky uses is quaint compared to what’s out there now, and his point that dopamine levels are higher in porn consumption now supports that, because people need stronger fixes than ever; his experience getting curated into the Hammer Museum’s Made In L.A. 2014; how being practical led him to keep his job working at Richard Telles gallery after this success, though he went from full-time to part-time; what he’s learned about artists and the art world from working at the gallery, a gig he’s had much longer than he thought he would; and how artists who become big successes may or may not maintain them, and that a significant part of their rise is beyond their control.

Tulsa Kinney talks about: coming to Los Angeles from southern Missouri; her art career, which was eclipsed by her writing and then her launch of Artillery, Los Angeles’ first glossy contemporary art magazine, in 2006. We talk about the struggles of running and surviving as an art mag, working with writers who are afraid to write critical reviews, the onerous aspects of the art world as Tulsa sees them, and the changing and expanding L.A. art world and how that might be affecting the magazine’s future. We’re joined by frequent co-host Deb Klowden Mann.