Los Angeles-based artist and writer Maya Gurantz talks about:

Getting out of the staid confines of where she grew up, and what it was (and is) like being an angry feminist from an early age; her ‘accountability group,’ a group of women artists (from various art forms) she organized to hold each other accountable to work-related goals; her teaching and mentoring of students, at U.C. Santa Barbra; making work that is “messy,” as in tending to be potentially less likable than other work;  and three of her epic essays: one on James Turrell related to his retrospective at LACMA, one on Carl Andre and Ana Mendieta (the piece that led us to Maya initially; and here is an Art Practical piece on them that Maya highly recommends), and one as yet unpublished piece on Mike Kelley’s Mobile Homestead.

IF YOU ARE TRAPPED Insta

TAKE IT Insta

Drawing Restrainment 2011

Art historian and art tour guide Lauren Kaplan talks about:

Her start giving tours at venues from the Met and the Guggenheim to galleries around Chelsea; the pros of giving tours at the Met- open and flexible access, liberal policies towards guides, and cons- some of the other tour leaders aren’t properly educated and give misinformation to their groups, which Lauren says isn’t her problem though it obviously doesn’t make it an ideal context for her business; how she organizes her largest tours, which can be up to 40 people, by dividing the group in half and leading a tour for each half while the other looks around on their own; a particularly memorable encounter with a star actor while doing a slightly compromised tour at The Frick Museum; how small tours (families of four) are more conversational that big tours (30-40) which are more lecture-based; teaching people on her tours to feel comfortable not knowing what they’re looking at, and how she regularly takes Chelsea gallery tour groups to shows she knows they won’t like or get (and sometimes that she doesn’t like), which invariably lead to the most interesting conversations; some of her memorable gallery show tours, including Thomas Schutte, Terence Koh and Carrie Mae Weems; the “ven diagram of people” living in brownstone Brooklyn and commuting to the museums on the Upper East Side, and she compares the two neighborhoods in ways you might find surprising; how she came to learn who the core demographic for her tours is (hint: she’s a modernist); and she shares some memorable anecdotes from her tours featuring both kids and adults.

Los Angeles-based painter Max Maslansky, along with co-host Deb Klowden Mann, talks about:
His Kchung radio show Riffin’, and his most memorable guest on the show (Jake Longstreth, with whom he debated about The Eagles); how he started the current iteration of his porn-based work, back in 2010, when he began collecting old photographs and storing them on Facebook, in both ‘public’ and ‘private’ collections, then selecting particular images to paint onto bedsheets; how porn, even in the art world, still has a taboo association to it, and how the porn Maslansky uses is quaint compared to what’s out there now, and his point that dopamine levels are higher in porn consumption now supports that, because people need stronger fixes than ever; his experience getting curated into the Hammer Museum’s Made In L.A. 2014; how being practical led him to keep his job working at Richard Telles gallery after this success, though he went from full-time to part-time; what he’s learned about artists and the art world from working at the gallery, a gig he’s had much longer than he thought he would; and how artists who become big successes may or may not maintain them, and that a significant part of their rise is beyond their control.