Clearfield, Pennsylvania-based artist Rebecca Morgan talks about:

Her hometown of Clearfield, a financially distressed former coal town, where she currently lives in the home she grew up in with her mom, in between teaching gigs in other states, which affords her tons of time to work, but also feels like suspended adolescence; the liminal relation she has to the town, which both rejected her and she rejects, and despite those rejections she’s roughly the only one among her fellow school kids who’s still (for the moment) there; her dating life in all its challenges and even brutality, through dating sites and aps, and which include things like driving 4 hours to New York to go on dates with art dudes; how happy she’ll be to settle in just about any city EXCEPT New York, even though she went to Pratt and connected with the gallery that now represents her before leaving the city, and how her current home in the middle of nowhere affords her the time and space just to exist (vs. killing herself to survive in NY); how she doesn’t think she would have left NY had it not been for her landing gallery representation; her very substantial Instagram following: how she got there, what she posts, how she interacts with her followers, and how it gives her a presence, and even sales, even while living in ‘the middle of nowhere;’ her most impactful IG supporters: Juxtapoz magazine and Amy Sedaris; body image in relation to her self-portraiture, which ranges from naturalistic to over-the-top; and we close with an audio dating profile for Rebecca, where she makes her intentions known and I begin playing a little matchmaker.

Los Angeles-based art business writer Tim Schneider, creator of­­­­­­­­ The Gray Market blog, talks about:

His nerd roots in the Midwest; “COINs,” which stands for “Collectors Only In Name,” who tend to be labeled villains for art flipping tendencies, as opposed to collectors such as hedge funder Steven Cohen, who ‘plays by the rules’ at least as perceived by gallerists, even though he’s also been known to flip works himself; his Gray Market blog, which he describes as “peeling back the layers of what we can see  reported…traditionally, and asking: Why are people doing these things? What’s the strategy?”; choosing between screenwriting and art for a career, and why he chose the path he chose; how he navigates the art world as a professional skeptic and somehow still get access to the inside, where some of the most useful intelligence is; the prospect of becoming “the Anthony Bourdain of the art world;” his upcoming book, “The Great Reframing: How Technology Will––and WON’T––Change the Gallery System Forever,” which he’s self-publishing, because it includes time-sensitive information that can’t be wasted on the overly long traditional publishing process (the book is slated to come out by June 1st, on the Amazon Kindle platform); and what it’s like living in Downtown L.A. right by the Grand Central Market (directly downhill from MoCA, the Broad and Disney Concert Hall on Grand St.).