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Brooklyn-based artist and activist Grayson Earle talks about:

His unplanned landing in Brooklyn, where he couch-surfed into a commune-style house, and where he’s remained since moving to NY from California in 2010; his fluid relationship with the identity of “artist,” ultimately one he embraces because it affords him more opportunities that if he took on the identity of “activist;” his experiences with artist collection The Illuminator, including getting arrested while projecting provocative phrases challenging donor Charles Koch  onto The Metropolitan Museum; his admiration for open source programmers, and the process of sharing software and information, and the choice, in his words, of being an artist who either influences culture or makes saleable art objects; his experience being onsite at the start of Occupy Wall Street, and his role procuring food for that first generation occupiers (including vegan pizza); interacting with the problem of where our tax payments go through his project Tax Deductible Expenses, which features Earle eating and/or drinking in a series of YouTube videos, with the receipt for his goods posted alongside; and his Illuminator projection of a holographic bust of Edward Snowden, in place where an anonymously placed actual bust was placed in Fort Greene Park, in turn making it an odd completion of the original piece (they wound up meeting the pair behind the bust of Snowden, which is now available as a file for 3D printing).

Watch Out or Don't #surprise #video #videoart #videogame #politics #trump

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New York artist Will Cotton talks about:

His neighborhood of Tribeca, where he and his girlfriend bought a place, and how he’s seeing Chelsea galleries starting to move there; his studio schedule, and how he still allows time to be social and finds the need to be out – including providing face-time for collectors, et al. – even though he’s had gallery representation with Mary Boone since ’99; how he consciously keeps it down to just himself making his work (he does have an assistant, Emily, who handles the desk/administrative duties), because he’s seen artist friends turn into managers more than artists; how he builds his ‘tabletop maquettes,’ and one of his anecdotes in which he got in trouble for the overuse of a root beer waterfall for one his scenes; another anecdote involving discovering something inside one of the cakes from his maquettes, after its long-since dried shell cracked; the genesis of his using live models in his candy scenes, and how that’s both been fruitful and also gotten him into a little bit of trouble for accusations of exploitation; the ‘hedonistic and druggy’ (specifically vodka and cocaine) phase of his life, just prior to starting the candy land-fantasy work that’s become his oeuvre; and his gratefulness for his life in the studio.

Clearfield, Pennsylvania-based artist Rebecca Morgan talks about:

Her hometown of Clearfield, a financially distressed former coal town, where she currently lives in the home she grew up in with her mom, in between teaching gigs in other states, which affords her tons of time to work, but also feels like suspended adolescence; the liminal relation she has to the town, which both rejected her and she rejects, and despite those rejections she’s roughly the only one among her fellow school kids who’s still (for the moment) there; her dating life in all its challenges and even brutality, through dating sites and aps, and which include things like driving 4 hours to New York to go on dates with art dudes; how happy she’ll be to settle in just about any city EXCEPT New York, even though she went to Pratt and connected with the gallery that now represents her before leaving the city, and how her current home in the middle of nowhere affords her the time and space just to exist (vs. killing herself to survive in NY); how she doesn’t think she would have left NY had it not been for her landing gallery representation; her very substantial Instagram following: how she got there, what she posts, how she interacts with her followers, and how it gives her a presence, and even sales, even while living in ‘the middle of nowhere;’ her most impactful IG supporters: Juxtapoz magazine and Amy Sedaris; body image in relation to her self-portraiture, which ranges from naturalistic to over-the-top; and we close with an audio dating profile for Rebecca, where she makes her intentions known and I begin playing a little matchmaker.

Los Angeles-based art business writer Tim Schneider, creator of­­­­­­­­ The Gray Market blog, talks about:

His nerd roots in the Midwest; “COINs,” which stands for “Collectors Only In Name,” who tend to be labeled villains for art flipping tendencies, as opposed to collectors such as hedge funder Steven Cohen, who ‘plays by the rules’ at least as perceived by gallerists, even though he’s also been known to flip works himself; his Gray Market blog, which he describes as “peeling back the layers of what we can see  reported…traditionally, and asking: Why are people doing these things? What’s the strategy?”; choosing between screenwriting and art for a career, and why he chose the path he chose; how he navigates the art world as a professional skeptic and somehow still get access to the inside, where some of the most useful intelligence is; the prospect of becoming “the Anthony Bourdain of the art world;” his upcoming book, “The Great Reframing: How Technology Will––and WON’T––Change the Gallery System Forever,” which he’s self-publishing, because it includes time-sensitive information that can’t be wasted on the overly long traditional publishing process (the book is slated to come out by June 1st, on the Amazon Kindle platform); and what it’s like living in Downtown L.A. right by the Grand Central Market (directly downhill from MoCA, the Broad and Disney Concert Hall on Grand St.).

Hudson River Valley-based artist Anne Lindberg talks about:

Her relatively new (as of 2+ years) home in the Hudson River Valley, after having spent 28 years prior in Kansas City; her roots in Iowa City, where her mom was an artist and her dad taught at the University; her and her husband’s decision to move from Kansas City to Ancramdale, NY, partially engineered through their pied-a-terre on the Upper West Side, which her husband moved into when he started teaching at Parsons School of Design; her unusual home and studio setting, surrounded by farms, and how the move to rural New York has been a clarifying process in terms of her priorities and the downsizing of possessions; how because of her relative remoteness, especially in relation to NYC, studio visitors need to make a day of it, between the roundtrip train ride, ride from the station, and taking a walk in the neighborhood, in addition to the studio visit itself; how the Hudson River Valley in general, though particularly its light, which she describes as both amber and seeming to come from the side, affects her work; her unique process of using a 10-foot-long architectural parallel bar on a 10-foot vertical table that raises and lowers on an electric wench; how pivotal her participation in the Omi Residency Program was for her work; and the whole world of farmers in her rural neighborhood that have opened up a new community for her.

 

Grossmalerman Show
Episode 1

The Grossmalerman Show Episode 1 from Guy Richards Smit on Vimeo.

Maxi Geil! & PlayColt
Strange Sensation

Strange Sensation from Guy Richards Smit on Vimeo.

Grossmalerman Show
Episode 2

The Grossmalerman! Show Episode 2 from Guy Richards Smit on Vimeo.

“Island” mood board:

Island (mood board) from steven eastwood on Vimeo.

Of Camera from steven eastwood on Vimeo.

London-based artist-filmmaker Steven Eastwood talks about:

His East London neighborhood of Hackney, where he’s been for 15+ years, and the evolution it’s gone through from dodgy to hipster haven; the divisiveness not only between London and the rest of the U.K., but also between generations, as in Steven and his father, with whom his values vastly diverge, who voted for Brexit and perceives London as intimidating and full of cultural elites, and ultimately wants the country to go back to the way it was; his productive time in the U.S. teaching film at SUNY Buffalo from 2004-07, after a 48-hour interview process (in the U.K. you’re in and out the door in 45 minutes, he said); his evolution as a teacher, which lead him to a Reader teaching post which allows him significant time to devote to his films; the complexities around distribution of art-based films – when and where to release and in what addition;

how his ongoing state in making films is to feel alien, how feels like a stranger to himself when he’s making them; his film Island, which will begin as a multi-channel art gallery installation before its release in late 2017/early ’18 as a feature film, and is about the end of life (literally); all of the complex logistics with legal as well as emotional contracts and the navigation of ethics that allowed him to be a first-hand witness on more than one occasion; how art has always had a relationship with death, but it’s been somewhat taboo dealing with it through film; and finally a story about a harrowing night on a Scottish isle that he and former guest Kysa Johnson shared.

Los Angeles and internationally-based artist Lisa C Soto talks about:

Her Global Child tendencies, which make her itchy to be traveling and/or abroad after she’s in the States for too long; how she misses the culture that one gets abroad, particularly dissemination of information – in the hair salons in London, for example, they’re talking about contemporary art, whereas here it’s about reality show-style pop culture; her growing up in both the south of Spain and NYC, which manifested in her 3 month travel rhythm; the strong lineage of intuition in her mother’s lineage, which gave her the ability to read people’s energy, something she was really good at as a youth, though “as you age your head gets filled with ego and so the intensity of that skill has dissipated, making me rely more on meditation”; her particular love of Ghana, where she has spent a lot of time in, will be returning to and would even consider moving to in the future; and the energy (and chakra) forces which are how she moves through and understands the world and universe (which she is not always putting out as conversational material but is happy to talk about). Soto sees her art works not as installations per se, but as force fields and cloaks.

 

 

Kansas City-based artist, educator and Rocket Grants program coordinator Julia Cole talks about all things Kanas City, including: the housing  and rental markets, which are still affordable, but gentrification is making its presence felt in certain neighborhoods; her public art projects, which she collaborates on with her husband; how living in such an affordable city allows her to take more risks in her art, since she isn’t depending on income from it; how she moved from being a scientist to an artist, as well as her path from England (which she still loves and dreams about) to settling in the States; the perils of working on public art projects, whose pay schedules are unpredictable;  how she’s come to appreciate her neighborhood and community in KC, amid a thoughtful meditation on acceptance and learning to love the here and now; how living in KC means not living in a sealed bubble (politically), which she appreciates; and she talks about her least favorite art expression of art jargon, ‘creative placemaking,’ which she co-wrote an article about: http://www.lumpenmagazine.org/thoughts-on-creative-placetaking/

And here are Julia’s shout-outs to long-term, influential Kansas City artists: Mike Sinclair, Roger Shimomura, Jose Faus, Egawa & Zbryk, Peregrine Honig, Glenn North, Cary Esser, Jim Woodfill, Warren Rosser, David Ford, Sonie Joi Ruffin, Miki Baird, Marcie Miller Gross, Albert Bitterman, Gloria Baker Feinstein, Mark Southerland, Erika Nelson, Jorge Garcia Almodovar, Judith G. Levy, Dave Loewenstein, Anne Austin Pearce, Marcus Cain, Archie Scott Gobber, Barry Anderson, Susan White, Laura Berman, Caitlin Horsmon and Charlotte Street Curator in Residence, Lynnette Miranda

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